Three examples of reasonable accommodations

When employers discriminate based on disability, they are breaking the law. In order to help disabled employees thrive in the workplace, employers are required to provide certain accommodations, provided they are reasonable and necessary. Such accommodations take many forms and depend upon the specific needs of the employee. Some common examples include:

  • Revised work schedule: Certain disabilities require routine treatment and medication that conflicts with a conventional work schedule. Disabled employees, when given time to meet these needs, can often make up the time during a different part of the day. A revised schedule might allow for longer-than-usual breaks for taking medication or a late start day one day per week for a doctor visit.
  • Job restructuring: A good employee with a strong work ethic can successfully adjust to a variety of job duties. If you are unable to perform one aspect of your job due to a medical condition, your employer may be able to assign those responsibilities to someone else while you take on work you are better suited to.
  • Assistive technologies: Many workers who struggle with a disability are able to thrive in the workplace with the aid of relatively simple accommodations. Employees with visual impairments may require computer screen readers or modified reading materials. Those who struggle with back problems may benefit from standing desks, special ergonomic chairs and other enhancements. As technology advances, adaptive equipment may help people who were once shut out of the workforce reenter and succeed.

Were you discriminated against?

Disability discrimination takes many forms. If your employer has terminated, demoted or otherwise adversely affected your job status, it may be a case of discrimination. If you struggle with a physical or mental health impairment and your employer has refused or neglected to provide you with reasonable accommodations, you may have legal options available to you.