Although baby boomers are aging, they are still active in the workforce. The global life expectancy is longer than it ever has been, and many people want to spend more time in the workforce. However, discrimination is making it difficult for many people to do so.

Unfortunately, age-discrimination is prevalent in the United States today. At least 21% of this country’s workers who are over 40 years old have experienced age discrimination, according to an insurance survey.

Age discrimination doesnt start at retirement age

Age discrimination is most common at age 51. However, about 40% of men feel that age makes it more difficult to advance their careers after turning 40, and about a quarter of women felt the same. This trend is particularly unsettling because most adults age 65 and younger plan to work after they turn 66, which is Social Security’s full-benefit retirement age.

Unfortunately, very few people who experience age discrimination file a charge or complaint. Many people are afraid to act because they think it may create a hostile work environment. Others fail to act because they are unsure how to file a complaint.

How to recognize age discrimination

Federal and state laws prohibit treating a job applicant or employee less favorably because he or she is over 40 years old. You may have experienced age discrimination if:

  • An employer passed you up for a job opportunity or promotion because of your age
  • Your employer reassigned you unpleasant tasks or an unpleasant job shift because of your age
  • Your employer excluded you from relevant training opportunities because of your age
  • Your employer fired you or forced you to resign and hired a younger replacement

If you have experienced age discrimination, it may be appropriate to seek justice. Proving that age discrimination occurred can be complicated, but it can help you receive the compensation you deserve.